“The experience of taking control of your life will change your reality, making it possible to achieve almost anything you seriously want to do.” Dr. Roth, The Achievement Habit

As we prepare to launch our March Mania Challenge, we are going to fill you in on the process on how we are determining the most effective health transformation.

What is it that most people want anyways? To lose weight, right?

Well…

We realize it’s not getting people to lose weight – it’s about getting them to want to work out, to enjoy it, make it accessible, build a community, and give them the power to be in control of their health and life.

People loved being a part of the COR community, the kids even join in on the fun (psst!…we are already planning the fun for KADP this summer!), all while pushing everyone to new heights.

“By changing the question, I have altered my point of view and dramatically expanded the number of possible solutions.” – Dr. Roth

The question changed –

  • “How might we get people to lose weight?”
  • “How might we prove working out is fun and establishes a healthy lifestyle?”
  • “How might we demonstrate the impact COR has on encouraging families to be a part of this healthy community?”

…by better understanding our clients.

Design Thinking is term coined by Roth and other Stanford engineers (typically used to improve on a specific product or experience, like a lightbulb or online dating). In “The Achievement Habit“, Roth explains how the same process can be applied inward, helping individuals become happier and more successful.

There’s innovation in the way we approach technology (think that hip watch you’re sporting on your wrist, or the new heart rate monitor) – we got that covered for you here – but there’s also innovation in how we approach our health. The latest gadgets are great and serve as fun motivators…but mastering yourself is all the rage as well – and free.

Nothin’ is more stylish than that.

When Dr. Roth, had first-hand experience applying design thinking to his weight-loss, he discovered that everyone can form the kind of lifelong habits that solve problems, achieve goals and help make our lives better. All it took was “changing the question“. By simply altering his point of view, the number of possibilities dramatically expanded.

So what’s that #1 question we talked about last week –

#1: “What would it do for me if I solved this problem?”

How do we ask the right question to make these next-level changes that step up the game, technology or potential of anything?

Step #1: Empathize” — learn what the real issues are that need to be solved.

  • Understand yourself and define the issue
    •  ex: Diet: Is the junk food the problem or the REASON you are eating the junk food the problem(aka lack of sleep, stress, cravings, triggers, etc.)? Too often we focus on fixing our diet, but what not on fixing the root of our behaviors. Sometimes it takes a nutritional analysis to understand these mechanisms.
    • ex: Exercise: In terms of weight loss – What would it really do for you?  Is it to live longer? Look better and be accepted by others?  Is it to build strength to improve performance? Longevity? Functionality?

Step #2:Define the problem” — a surprisingly tough task.

  • Become empathetic toward yourself during the journey as well as reframing the world and our perspectives

“Design thinking on the highest level is a way of reframing the way you look at the world and deal with issues, and the main thing is this idea of empathy.”

“If you have tried something and it hasn’t worked, then you’re working on the wrong problem.”

Step #3:  “Ideate” — brainstorm, generate possible solution, come up with ideas.

Step #4: “Build” – Create a plan, map out your goals, work with a coach, talk with others.

Step #5: “Test” – The final step is to test the idea and get feedback…when it comes to you, this means testing it on yourself – go try it! Is it working? Was it enjoyable?


Why does this work so well? Because it’s focused around you! Not your friend, not your co-worker, and not the bodybuilder on the bench over…but YOU!

There is both a growing need and opportunity to build collaboration between health and design to address the critical public health issues of our time. Applying human-centered design to address complex health problems (obesity, disease, etc.) creates environments and experiences that make healthy behaviors not only simple, but easy, enjoyable, and economical.

  1. Ask the right question
  2. Do what we’ve never done before
  3. Discover our capabilities

Written by Amanda Presgraves. Amanda is a senior Kinesiology major, Division I student-athlete and entrepreneur at James Madison University. As an advocate of health and personal growth, she’s on a constant pursuit to optimize life and inspire others through her commitment to healthy living. If you can’t find Amanda bouncing between the classroom, pool, kitchen, or volunteering, you can find her online as she continues to lead and motivate others towards a happier and improved life at COR through her article contributions, newsletters and community motivation. (@amandapgraves, linkedin).